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Posts tagged 'tea'

The Best Fall Tea Latte Recipes (And Other Yummy Seasonal Sips)

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 1 month ago 1349 Views No comments

Pumpkin spice, move aside…

This autumn, we're thinking of some interesting tea-based drinks that don't fit the typical mold of seasonal sips. Sure, cinnamon and nutmeg are always delicious in your hot cup of tea, but it's about time that we get more creative with our cold-weather beverages. Trade your jitter-inducing café latte for a tea-based latté or another tasty drink that will never bore you.

Two Leaves and a Bud Tea writes some helpful tips on how to create the tea latte of your choice:

"To optimize the flavor or your tea, it's helpful to understand what steep temperature to use for different teas. Delicate leaves like white and green tea should be steeped in below boiling water at 170 to 185°F, to prevent burn resulting in bitter notes. Oolong teas need a medium boil at 180 to 190°F. More robust teas like black and herbal can use fully boiled water at 208 to 212°F. A digital thermometer helps to gauge the temperature of the water, or you can keep an eye on how rapidly the bubbles break the surface when it's being heated to make a prediction."

Using this technique, you can always wing it if you don't feel like following a specific, step-by-step recipe! Use whatever you have in your pantry and apply the flavors that please your senses the most.

We have omitted ingredient lists below, but click each link for all the ingredients for each recipe and more fun tea content! Visit Heavenly Tea Leaves to check out our vast variety of loose leaf teas and pyramid tea sachets that can be used as the base of each of these delicious beverages! See our favorite fall sips:


Black Tea Latte (in just 5 minutes!) via Jessica Gavin:

Are you a traditionalist? If so, a black tea latte may be as far as your journey away from traditional hot tea takes you. But that's okay, because this latte is simply delicious. Using a quality black tea like our Assam, you can turn a watery beverage into a more substantial fall drink, in lieu of hot chocolate or eggnog.

Steep 1 oz. of loose black tea in 1 cup boiling hot water for 5 minutes (using a strainer or disposable tea bags). This will yield a concentrated tea for the latte. Warm milk in a medium sized saucepan, you want the milk near boiling but not rapidly boiling. If you have a milk frother, you can use it to create foam for the lattes. Add ¼ cup tea concentrate, ¾ cups milk, and foam (if available) to your mug. Add sweetener and toppings if desired. Enjoy with your favorite biscuits!


Rooibos Vanilla Spice Latte via Two Leaves:

Rooibos is a fantastic fall-time tea in that it's rich in polyphenols and said to help boost your immune system. Plus, it tastes great when drunk warm. This recipe especially enhances rooibos's deep flavor thanks to touches of exotic spices and a dash of honey.

Place one serving of rooibos tea in ½ mug of boiling water for 5 minutes (use strainer or disposable tea bag), then remove the strainer pr tea bag. In a separate container, heat milk & 1 tsp. of coconut oil. Add 1 tsp. of honey and ¼ tsp. vanilla extract and stir. Froth the milk mixture to perfection and pour over fully brewed rooibos tea to fill mug. Sprinkle with cinnamon and nutmeg.


Autumn Spiced Apple Tea via The Mostly Homemade Mom:

Reminiscent of the hot apple cider we all know and love (and especially prefer after a long day of pumpkin picking), this strong and cozy tea is ideal for snuggling up next to the fireplace. Sip on this one while you're contemplating stocking stuffers and other holiday presents!

Bring water, cloves, and cinnamon sticks to a boil in a small saucepan. Stir in apple juice (and sweetener). Turn the heat back on to low and simmer until heated through. To serve, place two apple slices in the bottom of two mugs. Pour hot tea over apples, being careful to strain out cloves and cinnamon sticks. Serve with additional cinnamon sticks in the mugs if desired.


Matcha Latte via Japan Centre:

Matcha is concentrated green tea powder from Japan that's good for your body and great for your soul. When turned into a creamy latte, its assertive and leafy flavor profile is mellowed and complemented beautifully. Showcase your matcha and please crowds with this easy recipe, which gives the option of frothing regular milk or alternative milks if you're dairy-free, plus the choice to make it hot or iced:

Spoon the matcha green tea powder and sugar into a mug or cup. Add some warm water and whisk until it is a smooth dark green paste to ensure no lumps form. Warm the milk in a small saucepan and pour into the mug until nearly full. Use cold milk for an iced latte. Use a whisk to mix the paste and milk together until smooth and light green in color. If you so wish, you can add a few sprinkles of matcha green tea powder on the top for decoration. Or add ice for an extra cold iced latte.


Cafe Chai Latte via Heavenly Tea Leaves:

This is a signature chai tea latte recipe from yours truly – the team here at Heavenly Tea Leaves. This drink of Indian origin is traditionally had at breakfast due to a high caffeine content (because it's based in black tea) and strong and spicy flavors (think cinnamon and cloves). But we say, when its fall, you always have an excuse to drink a chai latte. So without further ado:

Boil a 3:1 mixture of milk to water (Make sure to use whole milk for the best results!). Pour masala chai into the mixture and heat on a medium simmer for about 10 minutes. Add sugar to taste (you can begin by adding 1.5 teaspoons for each cup of liquid in your mixture), along with a sprinkling of nutmeg and cinnamon. Using a ladle and tea strainer, pour out the masala chai latte into individual cups, straining out the tea leaves and extra particles; serve hot.


Golden milk via Epicurious:

This is one of the health-promoting recipes that has been trending the most this year, and for good reason. It packs a strong-willed antioxidant punch without sacrificing flavor (or sheer beauty, thanks to its bright yellow hue). This concoction will leave you wanting more, no doubt.

Whisk coconut milk, cinnamon, turmeric, ginger, honey, coconut oil, peppercorns, and 1 cup water in a small saucepan; bring to a low boil. Reduce heat and simmer until flavors have melded, about 10 minutes. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into mugs and top with a dash of cinnamon.


Mint tea punch via AllRecipes:

If you're still in the mood for a crisp, refreshing tea drink rather than a hot latte, you're in the luck – this recipe for mint tea punch is just the surprise to your palette you're looking for. With the perfect balance sweetness, depth, and vegetal character from the mint, your Thanksgiving guests will definitely be asking for a second helping.

Place the loose leaf peppermint tea and mint sprigs into a large pitcher. Pour boiling water over them, and allow to steep for about 8 minutes. Add sugar until dissolved, then stir in the orange juice and lemon juice. Pour in the cold water. Pour through strainer into cups with ice cubes, garnished with orange or lemon slices.


So, next time you conjure the flavors of the season, you can use some of these recipes (or your own) to create something interesting and new. Use premium, gourmet loose-leaf teas from Heavenly Tea Leaves to take your cup from good to exquisite and enjoy your autumnal drinks in good company.

​Choosing the Perfect Tea for Every Version of You

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 2 months ago 1377 Views No comments

A true tea drinker does not neatly fall under one category. As a tea devotee, you could be a free spirit or a cautious introvert, a runner or a yogi, a businesswoman or a full-time mom. You could be full of energy or constantly calm; you could be all about having guests or happiest solo. Wherever your groove lies, though, a certain Heavenly Tea Leaves gourmet loose leaf tea is made just for that.

Tea comes in many origins, shapes, and sizes, each with unique, naturally-occurring properties. One person could prefer many teas and a group of people might prefer a single, staple tea. But most of the time, people drink tea based on their respective routines and moods. No matter your habits, personality, or lifestyle, we've rounded up the most suitable for each and every kind of tea lover.


Athlete's tea

Pre-exercise, you're looking for a tea that can provide you a smooth stream of energy. An athlete needs a tea that's both invigorating and delicious. That's why Rose Oolong, a partially oxidized, medium-caffeine tea, is the perfect option.

Rose Oolong


Sleeper's Tea

Those who love to doze off early and quickly each evening need a tisane that's synonymous with sleep. An intoxicating elixir of valerian root, lemongrass, and other sleep-inducing herbal ingredients will have you dreaming peacefully in no time.

Sleep


Holiday Tea

The air is crisp and family and friends are gathered around the table. Before or after dinner, enjoy the sumptuous flavors of this unique dessert blend based in high-quality black tea. Featuring bits of organic raspberry, cocoa husks, and flower petals, this is a truly festive brew.

Raspberry Cocoa Truffle Black


De-stressing Tea

Are you wound up tighter than you should be? Sometimes, all it takes to decompress after a long day or week is the right cup of tea. Our fragrant Chamomile Lavender blend captures the essence of relaxation thanks to healthy heaps of organic lavender flowers and calming chamomile.

Chamomile Lavender


Early Riser's Tea

No beverage provides a jolt of energy the way green tea does. If you're early to rise, you'll want a steady boost to last you for several hours without the jitters or the hard crash that comes with a cup of coffee. That's where Japanese Zen Super Green tea comes in. With a vegetal aroma that blends precious sencha with matcha tea powder, it'll be the most pleasant way you've ever started your early morning.

Zen Super Green


Exotic Traveler's Tea

Featuring body-easing and detoxifying ingredients like organic ginger and cardamom, Rooibos Cream Chai is reminiscent of the Far East and the spices traded along the ancient Silk Road. In a more practical sense, drinking this blend while you're traveling will help keep you satisfied, energized, and de-bloated!

Rooibos Cream Chai


Yoga Retreater's Tea

For the health nut and diet detoxer, tea isn't just a drink – it's a lifestyle. Our Serenity Tea is all about balance; it's made from the planet's most healthful ingredients like peppermint and chamomile – all organic, of course. This one will have you aboard the wholesome lifestyle train ASAP.

Serenity


Glam Host's tea

Having company over, be it for a fancy dinner party or a lovely lunch, isn't complete without the serving of a truly gourmet pot of tea. With its neutral taste and its high quality evident with each sip, no tea is more suitable for special guests than rich and flavorful Ceylon Black.

Ceylon Black


If you're unsure about which teas you prefer, our loose leaf tea samplers are a great place to start. Our extensive line of custom samplers is categorized by tea type and theme so you can try out a variety of options and figure out your favorites!

Tea is all about bringing people together and satisfying their taste buds, as different from one another they may be. The tennis player and the fashion model can sit together and enjoy whichever distinct Heavenly Tea Leaves blend strikes their fancy. After all, in the wise words of Maya Angelou: "We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike."

​Tea Traditions from Around the World

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 4 months ago 2312 Views No comments

The team at Heavenly Tea Leaves only enjoys one thing as much as we do tea, and that's traveling. Through our adventures and research, we have discovered that in each part of the world, tea truly takes on a new meaning. From Tibet to Turkey, the types of tea that people drink and the way they drink it are much more diverse than you'd expect. What ties most of these deep-rooted traditions together is the respect for tea, the process by which it is made, and its ability to unite people.

Like other nature-derived beverages, teas and tisanes can come from different plants, be grown at different elevations, harvested and picked at different times, and processed to bring out certain properties over others. In each country, there is usually a preferred tea type. And what to pair with that tea? It depends where you are. Sugar, butter, cream, tamarind seeds, and lemon are just a few additions that are common around the world. You can serve tea hot, extremely hot, or iced. One of the most famous tea-time rituals is the ancient tea ceremony of Japan, which has made certain that in Far East culture, tea is much more than a beverage – it's a highly regarded tradition. By contrast, in the American South, people like their tea iced, super-sweet, and often on-the-go in a disposable cup.

But just because you live in one country, it doesn't mean you can't enjoy and adopt the time-honored tea traditions of another. We've rounded up some of the most interesting global tea traditions that you may want to make your own one day:

Mint in Morocco

Touareg tea, more commonly known as Moroccan mint tea, is a staple in the North African country. It's customary to drink three cups of this black tea, poured from a curved spout held high above the cup (same goes in Turkey), infused with fresh mint leaves and often sweetened with sugar. Moroccan mint tea is usually served as part of a celebration or accompanying a delicious breakfast.

Turkish Tea Time

Brew black tea for approximately ten minutes and slightly dilute the mixture with some piping-hot water for a traditional glass of Turkish tea. Turkish tea is similar to Persian tea in its composition and in the traditions around it – namely, the ultimate hospitality toward family, friends, and even strangers.

Iran - an Ancient Tea Tradition

Brewed with a samovar - a water heater-crockpot hybrid adopted from Russia which is filled with wood or charcoal (modern versions use a heating element), and a small pot filled with water and caravan of concentrated tea placed on top,the ideal Persian tea is strong and reddish-brown in color. Before serving, the preparer will pour a bit into a cup to check its color and warm up the cup. Pouring the small sample back into the pot helps to stir the ingredients and distribute them evenly. Out of the home, a common place to gather and enjoy tea is a chaikhaneh, or tea house.

Russian Samovar Style

The centerpiece of Russian tea-making (like in Persian tea-making) is the samovar. The result is a concentrated black tea brew called zavarka. To serve, a bit of zavarka is poured into each drinker's cup and flavored with lemon, fruit, herbs, sugar, honey, or jam. Sometimes, hot cups are placed in decorative, metal holders known as podstakannik ("the thing under the glass") to keep them from burning the fingers. In Russia, hospitality, warmth, friendship, and tea are intertwined, and it is still considered polite to offer guests a cup upon entering one's home.

Argen-tea-na

Yerba Mate is South America's chai and originates in Argentina. This tisane is served hot and unsweetened and drunk through a special straw called a bombilla. The rules: don't stir the tea with the bombilla and always refuse a cup upon the first offer as a polite gesture (Same goes in Iran!).

Better with Butter in Tibet

Tibet is home to butter tea, or Po cha, a potent concoction that keeps you warm, cleanses the body, and serves as a centerpiece for time with family, friends, and even total strangers. To prepare this unique beverage, pu-erh tea cakes are crumbled into hot water and boiled for several hours to create a strong brew called chaku, which is stored, then blended with salt and yak butter in a wooden churn called a chandong.

Ceremonial in China

Although tea is all over Chinese culture, one place the tea ceremony dominates is at weddings. As a way for the bride and groom to pay respect to their parents, it usually uses pu'erh or jasmine tea with lotus seeds and dates as symbols of fertility. The couple leans on red cushions and assume various symbolic positions as important family heirlooms are passed down.

Taiwanese Tapioca

Bubble tea – the worldwide phenomenon of iced milk teas (black, green, jasmine, or oolong) accompanied by tapioca pearls – originated in Taiwan. A cross between tea and dessert, it often includes powdered milk and a flavored syrup. Taiwanese bubble tea is a modern twist on the time-honored tea drinks of its close neighbor, China.

England's Afternoon Addiction

England is the spot where afternoon tea has been a way of life since the early 1800s. Anna, 7th Duchess of Bedford, invented high tea, where black tea (customarily Assam) accompanied by a light meal was consumed with upper-class companions or family in the late afternoon in an era when lunch wasn't customary. The "high" in high tea simply recalls the tall tables at which the tea was consumed.

Japan's Chanoyu Tea Ceremony

Influenced by Zen Buddhism, the Japanese chanoyu tea ceremony involves the ritualized preparation, presentation, and consumption of powdered green tea, called matcha. Rooted in ideals of harmony, respect, purity, and tranquility, the chanoyu offers deep connection in a peaceful setting. From etiquette and flower arrangements to the proper use of tea-making equipment and kimono-wearing, each ritual has its place.

India's Chai Culture

Chai, India's national drink, stands on nearly every street corner. It's offered to guests, consumed during meals and breaks, or offered as a complimentary beverage in shops. Traditionally prepared using loose black tea, a generous helping of leaves is combined with water, milk, and spices (cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, and peppercorns). The resulting mixture is then strained to remove solids and sweetened with sugar.

Sweet Tea in the (American) South

Served in restaurants and at homes in the U.S. South, sweet tea is a regional favorite and an entertaining must. Strong black tea is brewed hot then chilled and accompanied by a lot of sugar and fresh lemon, plus a dash of baking soda to reduce cloudiness. For hot and humid weather, few drinks are more refreshing.

Trendy Thai Tea

In balmy Thailand, tea takes an icy approach. Brewed in a cotton tea sock using strong Ceylon tea, orange blossom water, licorice, crushed tamarind seed, star anise, and other flavorful ingredients, the beverage has a truly unique character and color. A "healthy" dose of sugar is blended with the mixture, which is then poured over ice, finished off with a splash of condensed milk, and served in tall glasses.


The common theme among these global tea traditions is the unification of family and friends. Whether enjoyed in the home, at a tea house, or at a special event, tea is the beverage that carries through from one memorable moment to the next.

​Tea and Sustainability: Going Green

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 4 months ago 1572 Views No comments

Agricultural sustainability has become a bigger issue than ever this year as a number of large corporations are taking steps toward reducing waste and pollution. As sales of loose leaf tea continue to rise, our duty to reduce our carbon footprint in enjoying tea should be at the forefront of our minds. After all, without Mother Earth, there would be no tea to enjoy, and wouldn't that be sad?

The huge recent push to ban plastic straws in the United States has come on the heels of controversial news about vast swaths of plastic junk crowding our oceans and even blocking the nasal passageways of precious marine life like sea turtles. By making tiny sacrifices on behalf of ourselves and our businesses, we can make a huge improvement in the lives of many people and animals around the world. Reducing our carbon footprint by lowering our daily disposable plastic consumption is a major step toward going green, but we can all undoubtedly do more. From kitchen utensils to office supplies to food and beverage, there are unlimited areas to which we can direct our attention and make a difference.

Tea is no exception – instead of being part of the problem, we want to be part of the solution. At Heavenly Tea Leaves, we are striving to make our full line of tea eco-friendly. Supporting organic and sustainable farming practices that help nurture the delicate earth from which our tea grows is just one step. All of our tea samplers are packed in 100% biodegradable kraft paper boxes; we encourage our customers to reuse their tins. Still, we are aware that this is just one of the many steps we can take to improve our carbon footprint. Ultimately, it's the small steps that we take collectively that will really make a difference in saving our planet.

We totally understand that making some of these changes may seem abstract. But there are plenty of tactics, large and small, that you can employ in order to contribute to saving the planet. We have compiled a list of some of the ways in which you can go green in your daily routine:

  1. Skip the disposable water bottle. This one is as straightforward as it seems. Reuse bottles like the S'well and save a ton of plastic. Unless you're in a dire situation, avoid purchasing disposable plastic water bottles! Plastic is one of the most significant problems we face on a daily basis, so making small strides is a huge deal.
  2. Get on your bike. Carpool. Ride public transit. In addition to raising your heart rate, biking is great for the earth, assuming you're doing it instead of driving, which burns dangerous fossil fuels. Carpooling and public transportation can really help in the grand scheme of things, too.
  3. Eat smart and plant-based. Natural and organic foods that come straight from the earth, like nuts, seeds, tea, fruits, and vegetables are your best bet in terms of avoiding chemical processing and supporting sustainable farming methods that treat the Earth well. Reducing your meat intake can have a huge impact as well, as over-farming and carbon pollution from cows have become increasingly problematic.
  4. Keep electronics out of the garbage can. Donate and recycle plastic and chemical-heavy items like old computers and CD players and make sure to dispose properly of hazardous waste, such as batteries.
  5. Think carefully about kitchen tools and grocery items. A metal tea strainer can be reused infinitely, whereas traditional paper tea bags are more wasteful. This also saves space (and money!).
  6. Switch your bulbs. LED lights give you amazing lighting without the electric waste. Plus, you save a ton on power bills.
  7. Support green institutions. Donating to environmental causes or staying at hotels that put sustainability first are great ways to create a strong economy around the cause, which in turn will help gain social and political clout.

It's pretty simple: The only way our planet will survive our current consumption, population growth, and environmental damage is if we acknowledge these problems and gradually make steps to bring change. Each one of us can get closer to becoming more sustainable and conscious of preserving our precious planet. Now is the time when we decide whether we want to sit back and watch, or make a change. And the will to change starts with each and every one of us. Are you in?

​It's Tea (Terminology) Time!

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 6 months ago 3173 Views No comments

Although there are many international languages – love, music, food – there is one beverage that makes the ranks as truly international, and that is tea. From the Far East to North America, from Copenhagen to Cape Town, tea is enjoyed and appreciated in people's daily lives. But what goes into making a cup of tea? What is the verbiage that comes with a hot or cold brew?

From the farmers who pick the tea plant to the final steps of brewing at home, there is a whole host of terminology that goes along with each stage in the life of tea. Whether you are buying pre-packaged iced tea from the supermarket, making a pot of loose leaf hot tea from scratch, or doing some research on the internet, you have likely come across some head-scratching vocabulary. Ever wonder what camellia sinensis is? What about a tea grade, a tisane, or a bloom? As responsible tea purveyors, we at Heavenly Tea Leaves are here to provide you with Tea Terminology 101: a lesson in the most important tea terms to know, no matter where you're enjoying your cup. Thanks to our expert team and some of our friends across the land of tea, we present our mini-glossary of tea terms without further ado:


Aroma: The overall scent (or "nose") and character of the tea.

Astringent: The bitter, harsh, and pungent taste and texture that remains on the tongue after sipping tea containing high tannin levels.

Body/mouth feel: Quite literally, the way the liquid feels in your mouth. Relating to texture, weight, and viscosity of the tea. Can be wispy, light, medium, or full-bodied.

Camellia sinensis: The most common species of tea plant used to produce black tea, as well as many green, white, oolong, and pu-erh varieties. There are two varietals of this plant: camellia sinensis sinensis and camellia sinensis assamica.

Character: The general, inherent traits of a certain tea type based on estate or region where it is produced.

Fair trade: Tea that is purchased from tea producers at fair market value and traded without coercion or exploitation.

Finish: The flavors and feels that linger in the mouth after you take a sip.

Flat/Dull/Off: A stale taste; the opposite of rich or brisk.

Flush: A complete group of fully harvested tea leaves that is ready to be picked.

Grade: The category given to black teas from the Indian subcontinent, Indonesia, and Africa, based on the size of the leaf and the presence of tips. Tippy, golden, flowery, broken, orange, and pekoe are some of the grading terms used. These are usually abbreviated (e.g. OP, BOP, FOP, GFOP, TGFOP, etc.).

Liquor: The brewed liquid remaining after the actual tea is removed from the pot. This is the part we actually consume.

Malty: A flavor or finish reminiscent of wheat or barley, often with a velvety-smooth texture. Similar to "biscuit" or fresh-baked bread flavors; the term is often used to characterize black Assam teas.

Mature: Tea that tastes ripe and full-bodied, lacking flatness or bitterness that comes with a leaf picked too early in the season.

Organic: Teas grown according to USDA guidelines or those of other national certifying organizations for organic farming. These often lack synthetic pesticides and other potential toxins.

Origin: Very simply, where the tea has been grown. You will usually come across tea origins like India, Ceylon, China, or Japan. More recently, teas and tisanes have been labeled with origins like Bangladesh, Vietnam, and parts of Africa.

Orthodox: Whole-leaf tea that has not been excessively processed, keeping to the original integrity and flavor of the leaf.

Pluck: The word for picking or harvesting tea.

Single-estate/single-garden: While most commercially available teas are a blend grown in multiple gardens, single-estate teas are all grown on the same tea farm.

Tannin: Also used as a measure in wine tasting, this is the chemical component in tea that determines its astringency and palate-cleansing abilities. Too-high or too-low tannin levels throw the balance of your brew off.

Tarry: As in tar-like – having a smoky aroma.

Tisane: Also known as herbal tea, tisanes are natural plant infusions that do not come from the camellia sinensis plant and therefore also do not usually contain caffeine. Examples include chamomile, peppermint, and rooibos.


We hope you enjoyed our mini tea glossary! What is more important than knowing these names, though, is knowing the concepts behind them and how they affect your brew. The next time you are tasting a new tea, remember, knowledge is power!

Teas of Spring (pre-Qing Ming) and China’s Qing Ming Festival

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 7 months ago 2592 Views No comments

Spring is celebrated in different ways in each part of the world as the flowers bloom and sun emerges. While we at Heavenly Tea Leaves kick off every season with new and climate-friendly teas, spring is especially dear to us because of the range of teas it welcomes. The teas we favor in this warm-up season can be hot or iced, bold or delicate, white or black, invigorating or calming. Regardless of your choice, this season is all about good moods and positive energy; no doubt, these feelings can always be channeled through tea.

In China, spring is celebrated with an entire festival called Qing Ming – or the Pure Brightness Festival. Starting this year on April 5th, this annual festival incorporates ritual sweeping of tombs (as well as pouring wine and tea around the tombs as an act of commemoration), kite flying, lighting of firecrackers, and of course, food and beverage offerings, which is where the tea comes into play.

As a major historical producer and consumer of tea, China has adopted the drink into the core of its culture. This holiday is ultimately about honoring one's ancestors through various customs meant to acknowledge both spring and Chinese history. Along with rice balls, cakes, porridge, and other traditional foods and snacks, those celebrating the festival consume various pre-Qing Ming teas.

What does pre-Qing Ming mean, anyway? The teas served at this time of year come from tea plants that are harvested earlier in the season, before the festival; this signifies drinking from the very first harvest of the year in accordance with the Chinese calendar. These early harvest teas, according to Fresh Cup magazine, are a super-valuable agricultural gift. "When the buds and leaves of the tea plant are harvested early and with care, they can constitute some of the highest prized, praised, and priced teas of the year. But each harvest of new growth—known as a 'flush'—has its own character," writes Fresh Cup's Liz Clayton.

She continues: "Teas harvested before Qingming... are rare due to the extremely short harvest window—which can range from a few weeks to around ten days—between bud readiness and the arrival of the fifth of April. Hallmarks of these teas are the tender buds which yield a range of complex and delicate flavors—from tea to tea these may be more vegetal, floral, or grassy than the later-harvest expressions of the same plants. They may contain a richer concentration of nutrients like amino acids and a lower concentration of astringent-tasting catechins than later pickings."


Early harvest Chinese teas are beloved by the Heavenly Tea Leaves team, too, as they are noted for their versatility and delicate nature. Here are some of the newest pre-Qing Ming teas we are featuring this spring:

Qing Shan Lu Shui hails from the Chinese Tashan Mountain region and is grown at an unusually high 800-meter altitude. Picked from the Anji white tea bush, this prized tea is noted for its mixture of bright green and yellow tea leaves, delivering a fresh flavor and a subtly sweet finish. Celebrated for its cooling properties, Qing Shan Lu Shui makes the perfect hot weather comfort beverage.

Gou Nao Gong is the most well-known of Hunan province's specialty pre-Qing Ming teas. This variety originates in Chenzhou City in the Mangshan Mountain region, which has become a popular tourist destination thanks to its warm and pleasant weather. The young Gou Nao Gong leaf is picked from the Fuding Da Bai tea bush, whose distinctive twisted shape and thick body yield a light and fruity taste.

Jin Jun Mei is harvested in the famous Fujian tea garden on the southeast coast of China, which is owned and run by a small and dedicated tea farming family along with expert tea masters. This black tea is processed with the whole leaf and the half-open bud of the Fuding Da Bai tea bush, resulting in a reddish brew and floral aftertaste. Jin Jun Mei is one of the rarest teas in our collection, as only 50 kilograms a year is available for distribution.

Drangonwell is a highly-prized green tea. The flat, long leaf is typical of this pan-fired tea, which is a result of highly skilled shaping techniques developed over centuries. This years harvest was plucked on March 19, 2018, containing notes of roasted nuts, with a smooth, crisp mouthfeel.

Silver Needle is a very mild white tea with woody notes. Although it is typically cultivated in Fujian, this pre-Qing Ming tea comes from Yunnan, China.


Above all, springtime is about coming together with friends and family to enjoy beautiful weather, happy occasions, and delicious meals. Mark any of these happy moments with a delicious cup of tea – and this spring, make it a pre-Qing Ming one from Heavenly Tea Leaves!

Thank you! Our Blog Makes It To The Top 100 Tea Blogs of 2018!

By Heavenly Tea Leaves 7 months ago 3558 Views No comments

Heavenly Tea Leaves blog has made it into the top 100 tea blogs of 2018! Thank you for all the support!

Link: https://blog.feedspot.com/tea_blogs/

How To Brew Loose Leaf Tea: A Beginners Guide (Video)

By Heavenly Tea Leaves 8 months ago 3516 Views No comments

Check Out our new video on how to brew loose leaf tea. We hope this is helpful!

Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWLCqg_grLI

​Tea as Alternative Medicine (Health Benefits of Tea)

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 9 months ago 5153 Views No comments

For as long as tea has been around (millennia, that is), the drink has gone hand-in-hand with healing. Eastern medicine has prized various teas for their natural healing abilities.

Of course, while we love to take tea with a lump of sugar, we must also be careful to take its curative abilities with a grain of salt. Alternative medical remedies may help alleviate or even prevent certain conditions, but it may never act as a full replacement to scientifically validated Western medicine.

Holistic and integrative practitioners like Dr. Andrew Weil and Dr. Leigh Erin Connealy prefer to take a "whole person" approach to medicine – that is, never using exclusively one treatment or prevention method, but rather, using all of them. In establishing Heavenly Tea Leaves, our founder, Noushin Ebrani, has found that drinking tea on a regular basis is one of the many choices you can make to live a balanced and healthy lifestyle. While a number of studies have linked tea to preventative and even curative benefits, we simply see tea as a piece of the puzzle in healing.


Though no single method can work miracles, the powerful components in tea have been shown to help combat the first signs of bodily damage. Here are a few tea types to add into your regimen of a natural diet and frequent exercise:

Chamomile:

This tea is a famous bedtime relaxation remedy, but a secondary and equally important benefit is digestion. Chamomile has long been used to treat colic in infants and is also a common remedy to alleviate diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome along with upset stomach, ulcers, flatulence, and more. But the chief digestive benefit to chamomile seems to be for the relief of acid reflux and other gastroesophageal disorders. Because of its natural anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties, the tea (or the extract) serves as a natural antacid. In addition, chamomile's calming properties contribute to stress relief, which is a huge component in reducing acid reflux flare-ups.

Beyond digestive aid, chamomile is suggested to provide anti-inflammatory benefits. It has also been shown to help reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression in certain cases. Try our Chamomile for the smooth, relaxing whole leaf tea you've been looking for.

Lavender:

In the realm of herbal teas, perhaps the best-known aid for relaxation and de-stressing is lavender. One whiff of its lovely floral scent will transport you to the rural lavender fields of France. Lavender has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years thanks to its large amounts of vitamins and minerals not often found in a single plant. Because of those ingredients plus its phenolic compounds and terpenes, lavender packs a powerful punch. Whether in the form of a tea, an essential oil, a capsule, or otherwise, lavender's calming character is undeniable. The primary oil found in lavender, called lavandin, has been demonstrated to lend sedating and muscle relaxing effects. The flower has also been used to reduce muscle spasms and headaches, balance mood, aid sleep, treat anxiety by offsetting stress hormones, and suppress pain. No wonder it's known as a relaxant! Other benefits of drinking lavender include antibacterial and antifungal powers. Heavenly Tea Leaves' Chamomile Lavender is definitely a customer favorite!

Green Tea:

Perhaps the most lauded tea in terms of health benefits is the vegetal, antioxidant-rich green tea. The tea's bioactive compounds help reduce inflammation, which in turn may contribute to cancer prevention. Green tea contains about 30% polyphenols (specifically catechins like EGCG), which makes it a very rich source of powerful antioxidants. While these antioxidants fight free radical formation in the body, they also help ward off many diseases, including the most pernicious, like cancer. Further, a number of studies that have specifically focused on breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers have shown that drinking more green tea was inversely related to the development of cancer cells in participants. This is not to say that green tea alone is a prevention or a cure, but it may certainly contribute. But remember: Always choose a high quality green tea. Lower quality green teas often contain excessive fluoride, and possibly other additives, making it likely more harmful than helpful. Our vast line of green teas gives you plenty of options for a range of flavor profiles and blends.

Oolong Tea:

While many teas have been attributed to helping drinkers lose weight, oolong is king. Consumption of natural oolong tea has been linked in studies to both weight loss and body fat loss according to the LiveStrong foundation; this comes with the caveat that the oolong tea replaces higher calorie beverages and is part of a healthy diet. The specific compounds in oolong tea, polyphenols (and again, catechins), are responsible for this weight and fat loss property, even effective in high-sugar diets in some instances. Not to mention, oolong contains caffeine, a metabolic stimulant and possible weight loss aid and appetite suppressant. A note: One 2013 study showed that drinking tea hot contributes to higher levels of weight loss than having it on ice. Tea for thought!

Pu-erh Tea:

Last but not least on our list of suggested medicinal teas, there is pu-erh. Because it is the most oxidized type of tea, it doesn't pack the antioxidant punch of some of its counterparts, but it instead has been viewed as extremely heart-healthy. In addition to a general cardiovascular benefit, pu-erh has been credited for the reduction of serum cholesterol. Because pu-erh is aged and goes through a fermentation process before it is dried, it not only delivers a rich taste, but it is also high in micro-organisms that in turn produce lovastatin, a naturally occuring statin (yes, like the drugs we take to reduce bad cholesterol). So, if keeping your heart super healthy is on your mind, pu-erh is likely a great choice. Our simple, mild, and earthy Royal Pu-erh tastes and feels divine. Why not give it a try?


So, holistic lesson learned – while tea is delicious, it's also a true health food and a powerful form of alternative or integrative medicine. Adding various teas in your daily routine can help you start taking the "whole-person" approach in order to treat or prevent certain ailments and contribute to overall well-being. Health is simply a collection of habits. One day at a time, including tea can be one simple and life-altering habit. Make it yours!



**These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

5 Warming Teas to Help You Fight the Cold

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 10 months ago 4563 Views No comments

Wherever you are, February is probably hitting you hard. The shivering is on, winds are blowing, and there isn't a dry sidewalk in sight. It is tea's job, however, to make us all forget our seasonal woes.

Certain teas simply make us feel good or please our taste buds. Others, though, are here to deliver us from the cold, actually helping our bodies fight the freeze, combat the germs floating around, and even battle the bulge. Warming teas, as we call them, are both warm in terms of flavor and in terms of their duty – to actually heat up our palettes and bodies. In the spirit of making it through winter's last push, here is a collection of 5 tea types that will make you want to sit by that cozy fireplace with a cup of hot tea forever:

1. Drink oolong tea to metabolize fats quicker, eventually leading to a more efficient metabolism and a warmer you. Aside from its earthy flavor, oolong lends a lightly caffeinated energy boost along with an abundance of crucial vitamins and other nutrients. If you can't decide which version of oolong to try out, there's always the Heavenly Tea Leaves Oolong Tea sampler – a set of four variations on this classic Chinese tea. Another option is a customer favorite, Brandy Oolong, a traditional oolong with a rich, nutty flavor. Pick your favorite one and make it your cold weather staple!

2. Some like it hot – and they usually turn to ginger tea. Sip on some Heavenly Tea Leaves Ginger Peach White to raise your body temperature and rev up your digestion. Ginger is also known to aid blood flow in the body and provides a laundry list of additional benefits, including lowering blood pressure, lending antiseptic properties, alleviating nausea, and even acting as a natural blood thinner thanks to its naturally occurring salicylates. Our Ginger Peach also contains a base of white tea, which is another warming tea (see #5).

3. Spice it up with an organic cinnamon-based tea like Ginger Jazz. According to the Huffington Post, cinnamon "helps dry dampness in the body and warms people [who] are always cold and suffering from poor circulation. Cinnamon is [also] antiseptic and an excellent digestive tonic." The warmth of cinnamon also lends pleasant associations to holidays and white winters, making this tea all the more enjoyable to drink.

4. Sweet, comforting, and refreshing, peppermint tea is a simple and straightforward solution to the dreaded February frost. Peppermint serves as a natural stimulant and works overtime to deliver a caffeine-free energy boost while delivering a soothing finish. Heavenly Tea Leaves' 100% organic variety is sure to give just the kick you're looking for.

5. White tea = feeling good. While super-light white tea isn't as popular as black tea, it certainly boasts as many health-promoting properties. It is thought that white tea acts as an antibacterial agent, helping deter our wintertime sniffles; the catechins found in both white and green teas are so powerful that they have even been linked to the combatting of the flu virus. To add some fruity and floral flavor to the simple flavor of white tea, you're best off trying out Pomegranate White from Heavenly Tea Leaves.

Don't be afraid to mix and match! Try creating your own in-home blends. You can cut up some ginger, take fresh cinnamon, and add some peppermint to create a delightful herbal concoction to help cure your winter blues. And while this is only one suggestion, you can try playing around with different teas, herbs, and spices to give you tasty results. You know what they say, you never know if you don't try!

In February, we can either look ahead to spring or enjoy this moment for what it is – a calm, cozy, exciting time of year. While the sneezing and freezing roadblocks try to stand in our way, a cup of hot tea can always come to the rescue. To recap, some of the most effective warming teas or tea ingredients include oolong, ginger, cinnamon, peppermint, and white tea. Based on whether you prefer caffeine, depth of flavor, or spice, you can mix and match each of these into your daily beverage rotation. Bundle up by the fire, bring out your chunkiest sweaters, and warm yourself up with a nice cup of hot tea.