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Posts tagged 'Loose Leaf'

Afternoon Tea: Customs and Etiquette, Now and Then

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 5 months ago 3818 Views No comments

Ever wonder whether you're following, or whether you even really know about tea-time etiquette? Living an informal culture of to-go tea and coffee (which means, yikes!, a drink that may or may not have actually been brewed, in a paper cup), it's hard to have the opportunity to sit down in a formal setting and engage in customary tea rituals. For some, it's hard to even imagine that there are a series of formal customs for consuming tea, which today, is an everyday (for us, 3x-a-day) beverage.

The origins of tea lie very far in the past, but it's really the influence of the British East India Company that turned a regional staple into a worldwide phenomenon starting in the 17th century. Tea etiquette not only tells the drinker what to do, but more importantly, it advises us what not to do.


Starting from the basics

When tea arrived to the West, people were left wondering what the proper vessels were to drink it out of. The answer? Porcelain, according to Jane Pettigrew of London's Langham Hotel, who described the history of tea etiquette to CBS News. (The stuff came from—you guessed it—China; hence the current nickname for porcelain serveware.) Until today, any fine tea service is made from some variation of precious porcelain, such as bone china. More modern and casual tea sets seek to display tea's rich and beautiful color, opting for glass. (Another benefit to glass is that you can tell how strong and saturated the tea is at a glance.)

Pettigrew describes the coming together of family and friends for a midday tea as "afternoon tea" for a long while before the less formal "high tea" took over as a cultural mainstay in England.

Elaine Lemm of The Spruce Eats describes the origins of afternoon tea: "When afternoon tea became fashionable thanks to the Anna, the Duchess of Bedford, it was never intended to replace dinner but rather to fill in the long gap between lunch and dinner at a time when dinner was served as late as 8 p.m. Lifestyles have changed since those times and afternoon tea is now a treat, rather than a stop-gap." Once industrialization hit England, however, this tradition became widespread, known as high tea. By the 19th century, the middle class had grown in Western Europe and tea before dinner became a routine in most households; it was no longer for the elite. This was a huge shift in cultural norms and accessibility that would signal a reduction in class divisions that we're thankful for today. Workers who needed some extra food after a long day were having more than just delicate tea sandwiches with their meal, but started to have heartier dishes instead.

Amy Reiter of the Food Network delves into the history of the term: "Contrary to the haughty images stirred by its lofty moniker, high tea is actually a lot more relaxed than afternoon tea. (The 'high' part probably refers to the fact that one traditionally enjoys it while seated at an actual dinner table, rather than on a low armchair or couch.)."

Today, high tea is generally taken between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m., often as dinner, while afternoon tea was historically taken at 4 p.m. as a snack for the elite. Today, the dinner meal is called "tea" in working class families in parts of England.

And how to behave at tea? Pettigrew also has a few comments when it comes to general manners.

"'I mean, you would never actually slurp your tea, but a professional tea taster always slurps their tea because that's what you need to do to get the sort of flavor. But no, it's got to be quiet, elegant.'"

Other notes from this seasoned tea expert? No clanking the spoon against the cup when stirring; no raising your pinky while holding the cup (it's pretentious); and when you have your crumpets along with your tea (yes, it's a thing), add a little wad of clotted cream or jam, but don't smear it all over! (On this side of the Atlantic, muffins or cookies go just as well!) Oh, and she'd never put milk in non-standard blends like oolong. Let the flavor shine through. According to Doltone House, an upmarket party venue group in Australia, the rules for stirring don't stop there. Start with your spoon in the 6 o'clock position and stir clockwise, setting the spoon down beside the cup when you're done.

Want to emulate high tea at home today? You can follow some simple steps to bring some tradition to your next family gathering. For starters, loose leaf tea is preferable over supermarket tea bags (which are often adulterated and of inferior quality), according to Afternoon Tea of the UK. Heavenly Tea Leaves' vast selection of gourmet loose-leaf tea leaves you with plenty of options; the most apt for this occasion would be the Afternoon Tea Sampler, which comprises four lovely teas to please any palette. For the caffeine-sensitive, the sampler comes in an herbal version, too. To stack your accompanying snacks, grab a pretty, tiered cookie tray, preferably in sterling silver for the full effect!


Other pointers

Never dip your biscuit, crumpet, or any other side snack into your tea. Layer jam over cream on your scone. If adding milk (for example, to black tea), pour the milk into the cup first for a better combination of the liquids. And when it comes to your appearance, dress up! Doltone House also recommends eating your tea sandwiches, scones, and other snacks with your hands (contrary to what you might think would be polite).

While etiquette centering around drinking tea might seem antiquated, it is in fact a nearly lost art, and a tradition that should be revered and preserved. We, for one, are working hard to help make that happen.


Photo credit: @bunabuna1234 (Instagram)

Après-tea: The Best Teas to Enjoy on Your Next Ski Trip

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 6 months ago 3947 Views No comments

It's mountain season! You might be going to actually ski, but it's more likely that you're going for some snow tubing, snowshoeing, jacuzzi time, or R&R in the lodge. From the snow-capped Swiss Alps and Aspen to the humble hills of the Berkshires and Catskills, the satisfaction of a nice cup of h̶o̶t̶ ̶c̶o̶c̶o̶a̶ soothing tea after a long winter day is the ultimate satisfaction.

One great part about tea is that it's easily transportable. All you really need is some hot water and you can make your favorite cup just about anywhere. The types of tea you want to enjoy at the chalet are deep, hearty, warming, and comforting. They do not skimp on flavor or intensity and they radiate the joyous spirit we still like to have coming off the holidays.

If you're heading to luxurious Banff this ski season, the Fairmont Banff Springs and Chateau even offers a luxurious afternoon tea that will give you a taste of the most exquisite post-slope blends (plus pastries, of course!), including green infusions, yerba mate, Egyptian chamomile, Maple Maple, and other signature blends of the resort. We've got to check this experience off our list.


In the meantime, you can create your own cold-weather tea experience no matter where you're headed (or, hint: even at home). We've compiled a few recommendations from the Heavenly Tea Leaves team to complete your next wintertime getaway.

If you want a sampler pack so you can try out a few different types of tea, try our Flavored Black Tea Sampler. This luxurious tea set contains four beautifully packaged loose leaf black teas that are invigorating, giving you the naturally-caffeinated boost you need to get through a physically intense ski trip. It will also help restore your energy after a long day of ups-and-downs, or become the perfect fire pit companion. Our personal favorite of the bunch? Ginger Black. (The ginger will help protect and relieve you from swollen feet, or the sniffles.)

If a spice-infused floral tea is more your thing, Turmeric Bliss is our preferred pick. This unique turmeric-heavy blend gives the punch of spices like cardamom with the calming floral notes of lavender, rose petals, and hibiscus. This blend will clear your head and warm your body in an instant – the perfect cold weather elixir. If you're brewing it yourself, make sure to use water that's come to a boil and steep for about five minutes.

Next on the list, the exotic theme continues with White Chai. This is a white tea blend – a great, relaxing option for those looking for depth of flavor with a lower caffeine level than that of black tea. This tea is made from Organic white tea, lemongrass, cinnamon, ginger, pineapple, pink peppercorns, coconut, clove, cardamom, and natural cinnamon flavor – a combination with a knockout flavor and aroma. You'll be warm and ready to go back up on the mountain after drinking some of this one on your break.

Another (very aptly titled) caffeine-free option is Heavenly Tea Leaves' Warmth. What makes it so warm, aside from the fact that it's best consumed hot? Organic turmeric, orange peel, vanilla, and other naturally cozy ingredients.

So, are you feeling toasty yet? These tea suggestions, in lieu of a fancy afternoon tea at a chateau, are perfectly paired with breakfast, lunch, a mid-afternoon snack, dessert after dinner, and even a before-bed treat (in the case of the herbal ones). What's special about a winter getaway is that unique juxtaposition of wood and snow, pine and frost, warm and cold, crisp and spicy, fresh and earthy. By bringing along your favorite selection of tea for the ride, you'll create just the right balance. Cheers to your next Après-tea!

Why You Should Drink Organic Tea (And Our Favorite Summertime Picks)

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 1 years ago 3852 Views No comments


After water, tea is the most consumed beverage in the world. And of the billions of tea consumers on the planet, many are drinking multiple cups of tea a day – whether it's along with breakfast, two in a row, or one with dinner and then dessert.

In summer, tea consumption shows no signs of slowing down. We might drink our favorite varieties iced, or choose different flavors to celebrate the cheer of the season, like berry or floral varieties. So, if we love our tea all year-round, perhaps the best approach to worries about the composition, integrity, and health benefits of our brew is to get on board with organic tea.

While organic tea may often cost more than a typical cup, its perks are endless and the knowledge of its ingredients leaves you with peace of mind (and depth of flavor!).

Let's start out with a few basics. Organic tea, like other certified organic foods, uses no synthetic fertilizers while being farmed. Its chemical-free taste leaves you with a more flavorful cup, no matter what type of tea you're consuming. Instead of being left on while the leaf air dries, the residues that form on organic tea leaves are manually rinsed off before processing. This method results in a natural and round-tasting brew.

Now, let's get onto safety. Tea grown in accordance with organic farming standards is totally safe. But why? Because the plant of origin is free from synthetic pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers – all of which end up in the final product in one way or another. As these teas are totally free from toxins and hormones that may seep into fertilizer, organic tea is also a great stabilizer, never affecting your critical hormonal balance. Also remember that these teas are non-GMO, meaning that they are not grown from seeds that have been genetically modified in a lab, but rather, are totally natural.

Moving onto another important point: healing. Many who are new to tea are attracted to it in the first place because of its world-renowned healing properties. And those drinkers are totally on the right track! Organic teas are super-high in nutrients and vitamins that have been demonstrated to help alleviate all sorts of conditions and illnesses, both major and minor. It is also a common form of alternative medicine and many times it is recommended in conjunction with a healthy diet and overall regimen. If you feel better drinking larger quantities of organic tea, you might be more likely to turn to tea for healing, and receive its best results.

Going hand-in-hand with healing is nutrition. As organic tea is highest on the tea purity totem pole, it may in some cases contain higher concentrations of key vitamins and antioxidants (including sought-after polyphenols like catechins). Because tea plants tend to pull a high amount of fluoride from the soil, a bonus to super-pure organic tea is that it may boost your dental health. Plus, organic tea has earned a reputation for carrying loads of disease-fighting antioxidants, as well as vitamins D and H.

Finally, organic tea has one other major benefit: saving the planet. Organic farming practices lend themselves to more responsible, sustainable, and ethical methods that prevent problems with pests and soil quality. Plus, organic farmers rotate crops on the same land year after year, meaning they hinder deforestation. A greener planet means better tea for all of us in the long run!


The tea experts at Heavenly Tea Leaves have compiled a summertime list of some of our favorite organic teas and tisanes, which we suggest incorporating into your repertoire. With fruity and floral flavors, as well as notes that lend themselves well to creating refreshing cold-brews, any of these tea varieties is a no-brainer. Without further ado:

Chamomile:

Chamomile is a known relaxant and sedative. It's floral flavor makes it a great iced option. Add a dash of raw honey for a nice touch of sweetness.

Ginger Peach White:

With a sweet nectar-like flavor from white tea, and mild, sweet peachy tones, Ginger Peach White makes a fantastic iced tea!

Orange Oolong:

Orange Oolong is a sweet, citrusy, and refreshing tea is perfect for the summer months. Its depth of flavor, thanks to an oolong base, is lightened by the distinct flavor of organic orange peels.

Organic Herbal Tea Sampler:

The benefit of tea sampler sets is that you never have to choose just one. Including flavors like rooibos, Peppermint, Earl Grey Rooibos, and coconutty Pina Colada, this tea sampler is your organic go-to. This delicious mix is also certified kosher!

Organic Custom Loose Leaf Tea Sampler:

When you don't know which organic teas to choose for summer, why not custom-make your own set of four? Organic Custom Loose Leaf Sampler gives you the ability to pick and choose from our vast selection of organic teas so you can decide which ones you love the most.

Peppermint:

Peppermint is a classic, refreshing herbal tea. Although it contains no caffeine, it provides a perfect natural boost thanks to an invigorating flavor and the natural energy-boosting qualities of peppermint.


Whether you like your tea hot, cold, or either way, the practices and final product resulting from organic farming methods produce better, more sustainable teas. If you don't believe us, give it a try and taste the difference yourself!

Teas of Spring (pre-Qing Ming) and China’s Qing Ming Festival

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 1 years ago 5425 Views No comments

Spring is celebrated in different ways in each part of the world as the flowers bloom and sun emerges. While we at Heavenly Tea Leaves kick off every season with new and climate-friendly teas, spring is especially dear to us because of the range of teas it welcomes. The teas we favor in this warm-up season can be hot or iced, bold or delicate, white or black, invigorating or calming. Regardless of your choice, this season is all about good moods and positive energy; no doubt, these feelings can always be channeled through tea.

In China, spring is celebrated with an entire festival called Qing Ming – or the Pure Brightness Festival. Starting this year on April 5th, this annual festival incorporates ritual sweeping of tombs (as well as pouring wine and tea around the tombs as an act of commemoration), kite flying, lighting of firecrackers, and of course, food and beverage offerings, which is where the tea comes into play.

As a major historical producer and consumer of tea, China has adopted the drink into the core of its culture. This holiday is ultimately about honoring one's ancestors through various customs meant to acknowledge both spring and Chinese history. Along with rice balls, cakes, porridge, and other traditional foods and snacks, those celebrating the festival consume various pre-Qing Ming teas.

What does pre-Qing Ming mean, anyway? The teas served at this time of year come from tea plants that are harvested earlier in the season, before the festival; this signifies drinking from the very first harvest of the year in accordance with the Chinese calendar. These early harvest teas, according to Fresh Cup magazine, are a super-valuable agricultural gift. "When the buds and leaves of the tea plant are harvested early and with care, they can constitute some of the highest prized, praised, and priced teas of the year. But each harvest of new growth—known as a 'flush'—has its own character," writes Fresh Cup's Liz Clayton.

She continues: "Teas harvested before Qingming... are rare due to the extremely short harvest window—which can range from a few weeks to around ten days—between bud readiness and the arrival of the fifth of April. Hallmarks of these teas are the tender buds which yield a range of complex and delicate flavors—from tea to tea these may be more vegetal, floral, or grassy than the later-harvest expressions of the same plants. They may contain a richer concentration of nutrients like amino acids and a lower concentration of astringent-tasting catechins than later pickings."


Early harvest Chinese teas are beloved by the Heavenly Tea Leaves team, too, as they are noted for their versatility and delicate nature. Here are some of the newest pre-Qing Ming teas we are featuring this spring:

Qing Shan Lu Shui hails from the Chinese Tashan Mountain region and is grown at an unusually high 800-meter altitude. Picked from the Anji white tea bush, this prized tea is noted for its mixture of bright green and yellow tea leaves, delivering a fresh flavor and a subtly sweet finish. Celebrated for its cooling properties, Qing Shan Lu Shui makes the perfect hot weather comfort beverage.

Gou Nao Gong is the most well-known of Hunan province's specialty pre-Qing Ming teas. This variety originates in Chenzhou City in the Mangshan Mountain region, which has become a popular tourist destination thanks to its warm and pleasant weather. The young Gou Nao Gong leaf is picked from the Fuding Da Bai tea bush, whose distinctive twisted shape and thick body yield a light and fruity taste.

Jin Jun Mei is harvested in the famous Fujian tea garden on the southeast coast of China, which is owned and run by a small and dedicated tea farming family along with expert tea masters. This black tea is processed with the whole leaf and the half-open bud of the Fuding Da Bai tea bush, resulting in a reddish brew and floral aftertaste. Jin Jun Mei is one of the rarest teas in our collection, as only 50 kilograms a year is available for distribution.

Drangonwell is a highly-prized green tea. The flat, long leaf is typical of this pan-fired tea, which is a result of highly skilled shaping techniques developed over centuries. This years harvest was plucked on March 19, 2018, containing notes of roasted nuts, with a smooth, crisp mouthfeel.

Silver Needle is a very mild white tea with woody notes. Although it is typically cultivated in Fujian, this pre-Qing Ming tea comes from Yunnan, China.


Above all, springtime is about coming together with friends and family to enjoy beautiful weather, happy occasions, and delicious meals. Mark any of these happy moments with a delicious cup of tea – and this spring, make it a pre-Qing Ming one from Heavenly Tea Leaves!

Heavenly Tea Leaves Tea Samplers: Making the Most of Your Tea Experience

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 2 years ago 14323 Views 1 comment

Picture it: You're perusing teas on your favorite gourmet website or at that amazing tea shop in town. Maybe you are new to the tea world or maybe you know exactly what you like. But either way, the confusion sets in. Do you stick to your tradition or venture out of your comfort zone? The options are endless! Lemon or raspberry? Green or rooibos? Bold or light? Caffeinated or herbal? What if your morning preference is different than your evening one? If you're buying a gift, the problems just grow – how can you pick just one and make sure that the recipient will enjoy it? How can you make one package look pretty?

All of these questions have run through our heads. As tea experts and addicts at Heavenly Tea Leaves, we have taken it upon ourselves to offer a delicious solution to your tea selecting woes: our tea samplers!

Heavenly Tea Leaves' signature gourmet tea samplers feature multiple hand selected, beautifully arranged varieties of loose leaf tea. Our samplers are always made with eco-friendly packaging and come in a number of sizes, flavors, and categories to suit your needs. You can even customize to your exact taste! No matter the time of day, occasion, or craving, here are some Heavenly Tea Leaves samplers that have you covered:


The Early Bird Gets the Worm

Organic Morning Lift Tea Sampler

Give your day a kick-start by brewing one of these enlivening aromas. From Minty Morning to Ginger Lemon Green, this sampler will never fail to help you feel fresh and invigorated when starting the day. Take your time to taste 20 servings of this awesome, certified organic arrangement.


For When You Just Can't Decide

Nine Flavor Variety Pack

Featuring white, green, oolong, chamomile, and several more tea types, you can't lose with this colorful set. Treat yourself or a loved one to a well-rounded selection of fine loose leaf flavors – a tea beginner's dream. Serve up a brew based on your mood, the weather, or your company!


To Satisfy a Sweet Tooth

Dessert Tea Sampler

Ever feel like having an entire key lime pie, but without the calories? How about a chocolate raspberry tart or a piña colada? Enjoy these delightful tastes and more in our Dessert Tea Sampler. If you have a one-track mind focused on after-dinner sweets, this four-flavor set is the ideal way to indulge without indulging.


Transport Yourself

Exotic Tea Sampler

For the upscale and well-traveled Heavenly tea drinker, we recommend the Exotic Tea Sampler. This certified kosher set provides an adventurous mix that includes Marrakech Mint, Organic Ginger Lemon Green, and other far-out flavors. This combination of teas is anything but typical and sure to please any serious tea drinker. Present this one for a special occasion, too!


Some Like it Cold

Iced Tea Sampler

If you've never experimented with cold brewing tea, here is your chance. Teas like Apple Green and Ginger Peach have been individually tasted and selected by our team for properties that lend themselves to superior taste when brewed cold. For a warm day when you'd love your fruity tea over ice, grab the Iced Tea Sampler and read up on how to brew your best cup.


Come Bearing Gifts

Tea Sampler Gift Set

No present is more elegant, practical, or universal than that of tea. This lovely package is a Heavenly Tea Leaves bestseller – and is it any wonder? With varieties ranging from the classic English Breakfast to the enticing Tropical White, there's something in it for everyone. Make a birthday, anniversary, graduation, or engagement all the more special with this unique gift.


Winding Down

Organic Sleep Tea Sampler

When all you can think about is getting some shut-eye, reach for our certified organic Sleep Tea Sampler and take your pick. Whether you pour yourself a cup of Stress Ease, Peppermint, Serenity, or Chamomile Lavender, you are sure to feel relaxed and relieved. A drink from this set is especially helpful for those seeking a peaceful night in.


A Monthly Surprise

Heavenly Tea Leaves Tea Sampler of the Month Club

What's more exciting than subscribing to a magazine, snack pack, or a makeup box? Tea, of course! By joining the club, you or a friend will receive two Heavenly samplers in the mail every other month. Sign up for just two months, or up to a whole year. Check out the designated samplers for each month here. The Sampler of the Month Club is an excellent idea for a holiday surprise, or a lovely gift to yourself.


So, here you have it. Options on options of Heavenly Tea Leaves tea samplers available in various sizes, price ranges, and categories. If you're looking for value and beauty that doesn't sacrifice taste and quality, Heavenly Tea Leaves is your final destination. And the signature sets featured here are just the tip of the iceberg! Take a look at the Heavenly Tea Leaves site to browse the full selection.

P.S.: If the idea of brewing loose leaf tea scares you, you have nothing to worry about. It's actually pretty simple. Take your strainer (paper, metal, glass, etc.) and place one teaspoon of your selected tea inside. Put the strainer in your cup and pour boiling water over it. Follow the temperature and steep time provided with your Heavenly Tea Leaves package, and voilà! Your flavorful loose leaf tea is ready to enjoy.


Teas of Autumn: Venturing Beyond Pumpkin Spice

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 3 years ago 8212 Views No comments

The fall season instantaneously reminds us of brisk air, rustling leaves, and pumpkin pie. And tea? Yes, please.

With temperatures falling and blankets coming out from storage, brewing a hot cup of tea often becomes a quotidian habit around this time of year. With Halloween and Thanksgiving around the corner, we are perhaps too often reminded of pumpkin and apple as the flavors of fall. These pies, cakes, cookies, and other confections adorn dessert tables, but don't these cliché tastes leave something to be desired when it comes to the most soothing beverage of the season?

Going beyond the ordinary, there are a number of methods, add-ins, and new formulas that will give plain-Jane Assam or Chamomile a run for its money. The new teas of autumn can also serve to complement the more classic flavors of fall, since we're not quite ready to give those up, either!


Try out our personal fall favorite first: the masala chai latte.

This is the sophisticated tea and coffee drinker's answer to a traditional pumpkin spice latte, which has dominated the commercial beverage scene over the past decade. While the American appellation for this Indian beverage isn't quite accurate, there's no denying its rich flavor and aromatic powers.

  1. Boil a 3:1 mixture of milk to water (Make sure to use whole milk for the best results!).
  2. Pour masala chai into the mixture and heat on a medium simmer for about 10 minutes.
  3. Add sugar to taste, along with a sprinkling of nutmeg and cinnamon. For the sugar, begin by adding 1.5 teaspoons for each cup of liquid in your mixture.
  4. Using a ladle and tea strainer, pour out the masala chai latte into individual cups, straining out the tea leaves; serve hot.

The result is a drink that emanates warmth – a rich and glorious dessert and beverage in one. The aroma awakens the senses with hints of cloves and cardamom.


For less of a sensory explosion, you could take the subtler route this season with classic vanilla.

Vanilla tisanes go hand-in-hand with warmth, and with the typical flavors and essences of the holiday season. The best way to get your fix? A tea sampler, of course!

Heavenly Tea Leaves' whole-leaf vanilla tea sampler is hand-blended and selected to please your taste buds on the briskest of days. This well-rounded pack includes Vanilla Black, Vanilla Rooibos Soufflé, Vanilla Green, Vanilla Rose Oolong for a variety of autumnal aromas. Because why should we choose just one? Bonus: it's certified kosher* and it makes a great holiday gift! Plus, herbal vanilla tea can be blended into black tea for a caffeinated kick, or drunk alone as a relaxing pre-bedtime ritual.


As it turns out, fall tea drinks aren't always about the heat. How about a tea cocktail? Some earl grey gin, perhaps?

World of Tea introduces us to this concoction, served at some of New York's trendiest bars like the Pegu Club. While mixed drinks like these are served at room temperature or chilled, they definitely warm us up on the inside. Plus, the earthy earl grey flavor is definitely a nod to the tones of the season.

Tony Gebely writes: "The Procedure: Steep 4 Tbsp of loose earl grey tea into a 750ml bottle of gin for two hours. Strain."

"Tea is astringent," he continues, "and in that sense can work almost like bitters, but you'll have far better luck with tea in the base spirit of a sour, with plenty of acid and sugar to round out and cut the tannic edge of the tea . . . Remember, proof in the spirit works like water temperature. You'll get more intense flavor steeping into a base spirit than you will a lower-proof wine, vermouth, or liqueur."

In other words, stronger alcohol is equivalent to hotter water, and black tea in cocktails goes well with sweet and sour flavors. Here's to an interesting brew.


Ginger is another invigorating fall flavor of tea that will never be dull on the palate. The properties of ginger are complex: it is at once pungent, spicy, and earthy. The root has also been known to help alleviate nausea, inflammation, soreness, and other ailments.

The best way to round out ginger's punch is to combine it with a splash of versatile citrus. Lemon – a flavor adaptable year-round – does this job perfectly. Heavenly Tea Leaves' blend, Ginger Lemon Green, which comes in a pretty silken pyramid sachet, satisfies all of our ginger desires in a healthy and balanced way. Not to mention, this one's organic.


And for some last-minute fun…

Take a look at this video in which Malaysian artist Red Hong Yi puts together a portrait called Teh Tarik Man out of 20,000 tea bags. The tea bags are individually steeped at various temperatures to create different shades of brown, resulting in an awesome final depiction.