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​Tea Traditions from Around the World

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 1 years ago 4495 Views No comments

The team at Heavenly Tea Leaves only enjoys one thing as much as we do tea, and that's traveling. Through our adventures and research, we have discovered that in each part of the world, tea truly takes on a new meaning. From Tibet to Turkey, the types of tea that people drink and the way they drink it are much more diverse than you'd expect. What ties most of these deep-rooted traditions together is the respect for tea, the process by which it is made, and its ability to unite people.

Like other nature-derived beverages, teas and tisanes can come from different plants, be grown at different elevations, harvested and picked at different times, and processed to bring out certain properties over others. In each country, there is usually a preferred tea type. And what to pair with that tea? It depends where you are. Sugar, butter, cream, tamarind seeds, and lemon are just a few additions that are common around the world. You can serve tea hot, extremely hot, or iced. One of the most famous tea-time rituals is the ancient tea ceremony of Japan, which has made certain that in Far East culture, tea is much more than a beverage – it's a highly regarded tradition. By contrast, in the American South, people like their tea iced, super-sweet, and often on-the-go in a disposable cup.

But just because you live in one country, it doesn't mean you can't enjoy and adopt the time-honored tea traditions of another. We've rounded up some of the most interesting global tea traditions that you may want to make your own one day:

Mint in Morocco

Touareg tea, more commonly known as Moroccan mint tea, is a staple in the North African country. It's customary to drink three cups of this black tea, poured from a curved spout held high above the cup (same goes in Turkey), infused with fresh mint leaves and often sweetened with sugar. Moroccan mint tea is usually served as part of a celebration or accompanying a delicious breakfast.

Turkish Tea Time

Brew black tea for approximately ten minutes and slightly dilute the mixture with some piping-hot water for a traditional glass of Turkish tea. Turkish tea is similar to Persian tea in its composition and in the traditions around it – namely, the ultimate hospitality toward family, friends, and even strangers.

Iran - an Ancient Tea Tradition

Brewed with a samovar - a water heater-crockpot hybrid adopted from Russia which is filled with wood or charcoal (modern versions use a heating element), and a small pot filled with water and caravan of concentrated tea placed on top,the ideal Persian tea is strong and reddish-brown in color. Before serving, the preparer will pour a bit into a cup to check its color and warm up the cup. Pouring the small sample back into the pot helps to stir the ingredients and distribute them evenly. Out of the home, a common place to gather and enjoy tea is a chaikhaneh, or tea house.

Russian Samovar Style

The centerpiece of Russian tea-making (like in Persian tea-making) is the samovar. The result is a concentrated black tea brew called zavarka. To serve, a bit of zavarka is poured into each drinker's cup and flavored with lemon, fruit, herbs, sugar, honey, or jam. Sometimes, hot cups are placed in decorative, metal holders known as podstakannik ("the thing under the glass") to keep them from burning the fingers. In Russia, hospitality, warmth, friendship, and tea are intertwined, and it is still considered polite to offer guests a cup upon entering one's home.

Argen-tea-na

Yerba Mate is South America's chai and originates in Argentina. This tisane is served hot and unsweetened and drunk through a special straw called a bombilla. The rules: don't stir the tea with the bombilla and always refuse a cup upon the first offer as a polite gesture (Same goes in Iran!).

Better with Butter in Tibet

Tibet is home to butter tea, or Po cha, a potent concoction that keeps you warm, cleanses the body, and serves as a centerpiece for time with family, friends, and even total strangers. To prepare this unique beverage, pu-erh tea cakes are crumbled into hot water and boiled for several hours to create a strong brew called chaku, which is stored, then blended with salt and yak butter in a wooden churn called a chandong.

Ceremonial in China

Although tea is all over Chinese culture, one place the tea ceremony dominates is at weddings. As a way for the bride and groom to pay respect to their parents, it usually uses pu'erh or jasmine tea with lotus seeds and dates as symbols of fertility. The couple leans on red cushions and assume various symbolic positions as important family heirlooms are passed down.

Taiwanese Tapioca

Bubble tea – the worldwide phenomenon of iced milk teas (black, green, jasmine, or oolong) accompanied by tapioca pearls – originated in Taiwan. A cross between tea and dessert, it often includes powdered milk and a flavored syrup. Taiwanese bubble tea is a modern twist on the time-honored tea drinks of its close neighbor, China.

England's Afternoon Addiction

England is the spot where afternoon tea has been a way of life since the early 1800s. Anna, 7th Duchess of Bedford, invented high tea, where black tea (customarily Assam) accompanied by a light meal was consumed with upper-class companions or family in the late afternoon in an era when lunch wasn't customary. The "high" in high tea simply recalls the tall tables at which the tea was consumed.

Japan's Chanoyu Tea Ceremony

Influenced by Zen Buddhism, the Japanese chanoyu tea ceremony involves the ritualized preparation, presentation, and consumption of powdered green tea, called matcha. Rooted in ideals of harmony, respect, purity, and tranquility, the chanoyu offers deep connection in a peaceful setting. From etiquette and flower arrangements to the proper use of tea-making equipment and kimono-wearing, each ritual has its place.

India's Chai Culture

Chai, India's national drink, stands on nearly every street corner. It's offered to guests, consumed during meals and breaks, or offered as a complimentary beverage in shops. Traditionally prepared using loose black tea, a generous helping of leaves is combined with water, milk, and spices (cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, and peppercorns). The resulting mixture is then strained to remove solids and sweetened with sugar.

Sweet Tea in the (American) South

Served in restaurants and at homes in the U.S. South, sweet tea is a regional favorite and an entertaining must. Strong black tea is brewed hot then chilled and accompanied by a lot of sugar and fresh lemon, plus a dash of baking soda to reduce cloudiness. For hot and humid weather, few drinks are more refreshing.

Trendy Thai Tea

In balmy Thailand, tea takes an icy approach. Brewed in a cotton tea sock using strong Ceylon tea, orange blossom water, licorice, crushed tamarind seed, star anise, and other flavorful ingredients, the beverage has a truly unique character and color. A "healthy" dose of sugar is blended with the mixture, which is then poured over ice, finished off with a splash of condensed milk, and served in tall glasses.


The common theme among these global tea traditions is the unification of family and friends. Whether enjoyed in the home, at a tea house, or at a special event, tea is the beverage that carries through from one memorable moment to the next.

​Tea and Sustainability: Going Green

By Jasmine Dilmanian (In-House Writer) 1 years ago 3939 Views No comments

Agricultural sustainability has become a bigger issue than ever this year as a number of large corporations are taking steps toward reducing waste and pollution. As sales of loose leaf tea continue to rise, our duty to reduce our carbon footprint in enjoying tea should be at the forefront of our minds. After all, without Mother Earth, there would be no tea to enjoy, and wouldn't that be sad?

The huge recent push to ban plastic straws in the United States has come on the heels of controversial news about vast swaths of plastic junk crowding our oceans and even blocking the nasal passageways of precious marine life like sea turtles. By making tiny sacrifices on behalf of ourselves and our businesses, we can make a huge improvement in the lives of many people and animals around the world. Reducing our carbon footprint by lowering our daily disposable plastic consumption is a major step toward going green, but we can all undoubtedly do more. From kitchen utensils to office supplies to food and beverage, there are unlimited areas to which we can direct our attention and make a difference.

Tea is no exception – instead of being part of the problem, we want to be part of the solution. At Heavenly Tea Leaves, we are striving to make our full line of tea eco-friendly. Supporting organic and sustainable farming practices that help nurture the delicate earth from which our tea grows is just one step. All of our tea samplers are packed in 100% biodegradable kraft paper boxes; we encourage our customers to reuse their tins. Still, we are aware that this is just one of the many steps we can take to improve our carbon footprint. Ultimately, it's the small steps that we take collectively that will really make a difference in saving our planet.

We totally understand that making some of these changes may seem abstract. But there are plenty of tactics, large and small, that you can employ in order to contribute to saving the planet. We have compiled a list of some of the ways in which you can go green in your daily routine:

  1. Skip the disposable water bottle. This one is as straightforward as it seems. Reuse bottles like the S'well and save a ton of plastic. Unless you're in a dire situation, avoid purchasing disposable plastic water bottles! Plastic is one of the most significant problems we face on a daily basis, so making small strides is a huge deal.
  2. Get on your bike. Carpool. Ride public transit. In addition to raising your heart rate, biking is great for the earth, assuming you're doing it instead of driving, which burns dangerous fossil fuels. Carpooling and public transportation can really help in the grand scheme of things, too.
  3. Eat smart and plant-based. Natural and organic foods that come straight from the earth, like nuts, seeds, tea, fruits, and vegetables are your best bet in terms of avoiding chemical processing and supporting sustainable farming methods that treat the Earth well. Reducing your meat intake can have a huge impact as well, as over-farming and carbon pollution from cows have become increasingly problematic.
  4. Keep electronics out of the garbage can. Donate and recycle plastic and chemical-heavy items like old computers and CD players and make sure to dispose properly of hazardous waste, such as batteries.
  5. Think carefully about kitchen tools and grocery items. A metal tea strainer can be reused infinitely, whereas traditional paper tea bags are more wasteful. This also saves space (and money!).
  6. Switch your bulbs. LED lights give you amazing lighting without the electric waste. Plus, you save a ton on power bills.
  7. Support green institutions. Donating to environmental causes or staying at hotels that put sustainability first are great ways to create a strong economy around the cause, which in turn will help gain social and political clout.

It's pretty simple: The only way our planet will survive our current consumption, population growth, and environmental damage is if we acknowledge these problems and gradually make steps to bring change. Each one of us can get closer to becoming more sustainable and conscious of preserving our precious planet. Now is the time when we decide whether we want to sit back and watch, or make a change. And the will to change starts with each and every one of us. Are you in?